Demonstrators hold up their phones during a procession in Central on June 9 to mark the first anniversary of the protests against the Hong Kong government. Photo: Dickson Lee Demonstrators hold up their phones during a procession in Central on June 9 to mark the first anniversary of the protests against the Hong Kong government. Photo: Dickson Lee
Demonstrators hold up their phones during a procession in Central on June 9 to mark the first anniversary of the protests against the Hong Kong government. Photo: Dickson Lee
Michael C. Davis
Opinion

Opinion

Michael C. Davis

China’s national security law: why are the elite assigned to defend Hong Kong not speaking out?

  • We are told Beijing must act because Hong Kong failed to fulfil its duty under Article 23 to enact such laws ‘on its own’. But why was an opportunity for reform squandered in 2003?
  • Local officials tasked with guarding the city have either gone silent or joined the chorus of voices in support of the new legislation

Demonstrators hold up their phones during a procession in Central on June 9 to mark the first anniversary of the protests against the Hong Kong government. Photo: Dickson Lee Demonstrators hold up their phones during a procession in Central on June 9 to mark the first anniversary of the protests against the Hong Kong government. Photo: Dickson Lee
Demonstrators hold up their phones during a procession in Central on June 9 to mark the first anniversary of the protests against the Hong Kong government. Photo: Dickson Lee
READ FULL ARTICLE
Michael C. Davis

Michael C. Davis

Michael C. Davis is professor of law and international affairs at the O.P. Jindal Global University in India and a resident fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Centre in Washington, DC. A professor in the Law Faculty at the University of Hong Kong until late 2016, he continues as a non-resident senior fellow in the university’s Centre for Comparative and Public Law.