A protester stands in front of Hong Kong’s largest mosque, Kowloon Mosque, and holds a banner to show support for ethnic minorities last October, after a police cannon sprayed blue dye on the mosque and people outside. Photo: Raquel Carvalho A protester stands in front of Hong Kong’s largest mosque, Kowloon Mosque, and holds a banner to show support for ethnic minorities last October, after a police cannon sprayed blue dye on the mosque and people outside. Photo: Raquel Carvalho
A protester stands in front of Hong Kong’s largest mosque, Kowloon Mosque, and holds a banner to show support for ethnic minorities last October, after a police cannon sprayed blue dye on the mosque and people outside. Photo: Raquel Carvalho
Justin Bong-Kwan
Opinion

Opinion

Justin Bong-Kwan

Black Lives Matter protests offer an opportunity for Hong Kong to examine police attitudes to the city’s racial minorities

  • The 2009 police killing of a Nepalese man shocked Hong Kong’s ethnic minorities, who have long complained of racial profiling
  • An inquiry into institutional racism is long overdue. The government must start to remedy any racial injustices in the community

A protester stands in front of Hong Kong’s largest mosque, Kowloon Mosque, and holds a banner to show support for ethnic minorities last October, after a police cannon sprayed blue dye on the mosque and people outside. Photo: Raquel Carvalho A protester stands in front of Hong Kong’s largest mosque, Kowloon Mosque, and holds a banner to show support for ethnic minorities last October, after a police cannon sprayed blue dye on the mosque and people outside. Photo: Raquel Carvalho
A protester stands in front of Hong Kong’s largest mosque, Kowloon Mosque, and holds a banner to show support for ethnic minorities last October, after a police cannon sprayed blue dye on the mosque and people outside. Photo: Raquel Carvalho
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