Residential buildings are illuminated under Lion Rock in Kowloon, Hong Kong, on May 7. Lawmakers have shelved plans to impose a vacancy tax, which was designed to punish property developers who hoard newly completed flats, taking advantage of the housing shortages to push up prices. Photo: Sun Yeung Residential buildings are illuminated under Lion Rock in Kowloon, Hong Kong, on May 7. Lawmakers have shelved plans to impose a vacancy tax, which was designed to punish property developers who hoard newly completed flats, taking advantage of the housing shortages to push up prices. Photo: Sun Yeung
Residential buildings are illuminated under Lion Rock in Kowloon, Hong Kong, on May 7. Lawmakers have shelved plans to impose a vacancy tax, which was designed to punish property developers who hoard newly completed flats, taking advantage of the housing shortages to push up prices. Photo: Sun Yeung
Alice Wu
Opinion

Opinion

Alice Wu

When Hong Kong’s lawmakers can’t get their own house in order, no wonder Beijing is stepping in

  • Toxic politics has crippled Hong Kong. While Beijing officials act with lightning speed on important legislative work in the shape of a new national security law, we cannot even enact a waste disposal charge, vacancy tax on property or an extension to maternity leave

Residential buildings are illuminated under Lion Rock in Kowloon, Hong Kong, on May 7. Lawmakers have shelved plans to impose a vacancy tax, which was designed to punish property developers who hoard newly completed flats, taking advantage of the housing shortages to push up prices. Photo: Sun Yeung Residential buildings are illuminated under Lion Rock in Kowloon, Hong Kong, on May 7. Lawmakers have shelved plans to impose a vacancy tax, which was designed to punish property developers who hoard newly completed flats, taking advantage of the housing shortages to push up prices. Photo: Sun Yeung
Residential buildings are illuminated under Lion Rock in Kowloon, Hong Kong, on May 7. Lawmakers have shelved plans to impose a vacancy tax, which was designed to punish property developers who hoard newly completed flats, taking advantage of the housing shortages to push up prices. Photo: Sun Yeung
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Alice Wu

Alice Wu

Alice Wu fell down the rabbit hole of politics aged 12, when she ran her first election campaign. She has been writing about local politics and current affairs for the Post since 2008. Alice's daily needs include her journals, books, a multi-coloured pen and several lattes.