A hoarding publicising the national security law is seen beyond a Chinese national flag being held up by a pro-China activist during a rally outside the US consulate general in Hong Kong on June 26. Photo: AFP A hoarding publicising the national security law is seen beyond a Chinese national flag being held up by a pro-China activist during a rally outside the US consulate general in Hong Kong on June 26. Photo: AFP
A hoarding publicising the national security law is seen beyond a Chinese national flag being held up by a pro-China activist during a rally outside the US consulate general in Hong Kong on June 26. Photo: AFP
Grenville Cross
Opinion

Opinion

Grenville Cross

Why Hong Kong’s new national security law includes mandatory minimum sentences

  • The introduction of minimum sentences for some offences under the national security law is unusual for Hong Kong, although these provisions exist in other jurisdictions for their deterrent effect
  • The inclusion of mitigating factors in the legislation will enable the courts to soften the impact of the mandatory sentences

A hoarding publicising the national security law is seen beyond a Chinese national flag being held up by a pro-China activist during a rally outside the US consulate general in Hong Kong on June 26. Photo: AFP A hoarding publicising the national security law is seen beyond a Chinese national flag being held up by a pro-China activist during a rally outside the US consulate general in Hong Kong on June 26. Photo: AFP
A hoarding publicising the national security law is seen beyond a Chinese national flag being held up by a pro-China activist during a rally outside the US consulate general in Hong Kong on June 26. Photo: AFP
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Grenville Cross

Grenville Cross

Grenville Cross SC is a criminal justice analyst, a barrister (Queen’s counsel and senior counsel), and vice-chairman of the senate of the International Association of Prosecutors. He is sentencing editor of Hong Kong Cases and Archbold Hong Kong, and co-author of Sentencing in Hong Kong. He was the director of public prosecutions from 1997 to 2009.