People wearing face masks walk past a bank in Beijing on April 4. Strong economic growth would discourage Chinese policymakers from rolling out bigger stimulus measures. The People’s Bank of China has already become more cautious in its injection of liquidity. Photo: Reuters People wearing face masks walk past a bank in Beijing on April 4. Strong economic growth would discourage Chinese policymakers from rolling out bigger stimulus measures. The People’s Bank of China has already become more cautious in its injection of liquidity. Photo: Reuters
People wearing face masks walk past a bank in Beijing on April 4. Strong economic growth would discourage Chinese policymakers from rolling out bigger stimulus measures. The People’s Bank of China has already become more cautious in its injection of liquidity. Photo: Reuters
Sylvia Sheng
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Sylvia Sheng

Why China’s A-share market is starting to look like a safe haven

  • China’s economic recovery is on track and policies are cautiously supportive. US tensions and tariff risks remain but China’s containment of resurgent infections is lending its stock market characteristics of a relative safe haven

People wearing face masks walk past a bank in Beijing on April 4. Strong economic growth would discourage Chinese policymakers from rolling out bigger stimulus measures. The People’s Bank of China has already become more cautious in its injection of liquidity. Photo: Reuters People wearing face masks walk past a bank in Beijing on April 4. Strong economic growth would discourage Chinese policymakers from rolling out bigger stimulus measures. The People’s Bank of China has already become more cautious in its injection of liquidity. Photo: Reuters
People wearing face masks walk past a bank in Beijing on April 4. Strong economic growth would discourage Chinese policymakers from rolling out bigger stimulus measures. The People’s Bank of China has already become more cautious in its injection of liquidity. Photo: Reuters
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Sylvia Sheng

Sylvia Sheng

Sylvia Sheng, vice president, is a global strategist on the multi-asset solutions team, responsible for communicating the group's economic and asset allocation strategy, based in Hong Kong. Prior to joining J.P. Morgan, she worked as a China and Asia economist at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. She has a PhD in economics from the University of Cambridge and an MPhil and BA in economics from the same university.