With the US and China locked into narratives about each other, decoupling can only accelerate. Photo: Shutterstock With the US and China locked into narratives about each other, decoupling can only accelerate. Photo: Shutterstock
With the US and China locked into narratives about each other, decoupling can only accelerate. Photo: Shutterstock
James Carouso
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by James Carouso and Penny Tucker

US-China rivalry: How companies can adjust to geopolitical shift as decoupling accelerates

  • Companies can count on the rules and dispute resolution mechanisms of free-trade agreements, take advantage of Western funding agencies such as the DFC and seek global forums such as Apec to keep conversations going

With the US and China locked into narratives about each other, decoupling can only accelerate. Photo: Shutterstock With the US and China locked into narratives about each other, decoupling can only accelerate. Photo: Shutterstock
With the US and China locked into narratives about each other, decoupling can only accelerate. Photo: Shutterstock
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James Carouso

James Carouso

James Carouso is the managing director for BowerGroupAsia in Singapore. Prior to joining BGA, he was the senior foreign policy adviser to the US Indo-Pacific Command in Hawaii. Earlier, he served as chargé d’ affaires at the US Embassy in Canberra, Australia. His earlier diplomatic postings including Thailand and Indonesia.

Penny Tucker

Penny Tucker

Penny Tucker is a senior adviser to BowerGroupAsia in New Zealand. Penny began her career at the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, serving in embassies in Manila and Brussels. After leaving the foreign service, she became director of a US trade and regulatory consultancy in Washington, DC.