US President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Charlotte, North Carolina on March 2. Anti-China rhetoric is expected to spike further in the run-up to the US presidential election. Photo: APUS President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Charlotte, North Carolina on March 2. Anti-China rhetoric is expected to spike further in the run-up to the US presidential election. Photo: AP
US President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Charlotte, North Carolina on March 2. Anti-China rhetoric is expected to spike further in the run-up to the US presidential election. Photo: AP
Robert Lawrence Kuhn
Opinion

Opinion

Robert Lawrence Kuhn

Anti-China rhetoric is not just US election bluster this time around

  • Experience has taught Chinese leaders not to take statements made about China during US elections too seriously. However, this time, the window of opportunity to reset relations after the elections will be narrower and the differences wider

US President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Charlotte, North Carolina on March 2. Anti-China rhetoric is expected to spike further in the run-up to the US presidential election. Photo: APUS President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Charlotte, North Carolina on March 2. Anti-China rhetoric is expected to spike further in the run-up to the US presidential election. Photo: AP
US President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Charlotte, North Carolina on March 2. Anti-China rhetoric is expected to spike further in the run-up to the US presidential election. Photo: AP
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