A gay couple kisses under a rainbow-coloured scarf during a party after a mass wedding organised by the Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) China organisation on a cruise in the open seas en route to Sasebo, Japan, on June 15, 2017. About 800 members of the Chinese LGBT community and their parents spent four days on a cruise trip organised by the NGO. Photo: EPA A gay couple kisses under a rainbow-coloured scarf during a party after a mass wedding organised by the Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) China organisation on a cruise in the open seas en route to Sasebo, Japan, on June 15, 2017. About 800 members of the Chinese LGBT community and their parents spent four days on a cruise trip organised by the NGO. Photo: EPA
A gay couple kisses under a rainbow-coloured scarf during a party after a mass wedding organised by the Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) China organisation on a cruise in the open seas en route to Sasebo, Japan, on June 15, 2017. About 800 members of the Chinese LGBT community and their parents spent four days on a cruise trip organised by the NGO. Photo: EPA
Lucetta Kam
Opinion

Opinion

Lucetta Kam

Why the struggle for same-sex marriage in China will continue, despite civil code setback

  • The primacy of heterosexual marriage in Chinese society means that there are negative social and economic consequences to remaining unwed
  • The LGBT community has developed many coping strategies – from lesbian women and gay men marrying each other to couples tying the knot outside China or unofficially via an app

A gay couple kisses under a rainbow-coloured scarf during a party after a mass wedding organised by the Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) China organisation on a cruise in the open seas en route to Sasebo, Japan, on June 15, 2017. About 800 members of the Chinese LGBT community and their parents spent four days on a cruise trip organised by the NGO. Photo: EPA A gay couple kisses under a rainbow-coloured scarf during a party after a mass wedding organised by the Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) China organisation on a cruise in the open seas en route to Sasebo, Japan, on June 15, 2017. About 800 members of the Chinese LGBT community and their parents spent four days on a cruise trip organised by the NGO. Photo: EPA
A gay couple kisses under a rainbow-coloured scarf during a party after a mass wedding organised by the Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) China organisation on a cruise in the open seas en route to Sasebo, Japan, on June 15, 2017. About 800 members of the Chinese LGBT community and their parents spent four days on a cruise trip organised by the NGO. Photo: EPA
READ FULL ARTICLE
Lucetta Kam

Lucetta Kam

Lucetta Kam is associate professor in the Department of Humanities and Creative Writing at Hong Kong Baptist University. Her research interests include queer migration, tongzhi communities and culture in China and Hong Kong, and East Asian queer popular culture. She is the author of Shanghai Lalas: Female Tongzhi Communities and Politics in Urban China.