Protesters display a banner saying: “I want universal suffrage” during a march on July 1, 2016. Pro-establishment lawmakers have insisted that a lack of national security was the primary factor holding Hong Kong back from “deserving” universal suffrage. Photo: AP
Brian YS Wong
Opinion

Opinion

Brian YS Wong

With national security law in place, Hong Kong’s centrists should now seek universal suffrage

  • As both ends of the political spectrum wage an ideological war, centrists must articulate a cogent, progressive and reformist vision to fix the long-standing governance problems, and stand up for the city’s values
Protesters display a banner saying: “I want universal suffrage” during a march on July 1, 2016. Pro-establishment lawmakers have insisted that a lack of national security was the primary factor holding Hong Kong back from “deserving” universal suffrage. Photo: AP
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