The Sydney Opera House is seen through a Chinese flag. Understandably, where some of China’s activities are not in line with Australian values, they attract criticism. But does that mean Australia should throw away its economic security? Photo: AFP The Sydney Opera House is seen through a Chinese flag. Understandably, where some of China’s activities are not in line with Australian values, they attract criticism. But does that mean Australia should throw away its economic security? Photo: AFP
The Sydney Opera House is seen through a Chinese flag. Understandably, where some of China’s activities are not in line with Australian values, they attract criticism. But does that mean Australia should throw away its economic security? Photo: AFP
Yuan Jiang
Opinion

Opinion

Yuan Jiang

Unlike the US, Australia cannot afford to decouple from China

  • As Australia draws closer to the US in the name of national security and pursues trade diversification, it risks alienating China, its largest trading partner by far with a crucial role in its economic recovery

The Sydney Opera House is seen through a Chinese flag. Understandably, where some of China’s activities are not in line with Australian values, they attract criticism. But does that mean Australia should throw away its economic security? Photo: AFP The Sydney Opera House is seen through a Chinese flag. Understandably, where some of China’s activities are not in line with Australian values, they attract criticism. But does that mean Australia should throw away its economic security? Photo: AFP
The Sydney Opera House is seen through a Chinese flag. Understandably, where some of China’s activities are not in line with Australian values, they attract criticism. But does that mean Australia should throw away its economic security? Photo: AFP
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Yuan Jiang

Yuan Jiang

Yuan Jiang is a Chinese PhD student at the Queensland University of Technology. He is affiliated with the QUT Digital Media Research Centre. He completed his master’s degree in political science at Moscow State Institute of International Relations and bachelor’s degree in law at Shanghai University. He has served as an account manager at ZTE Corporation in Moscow. He also speaks Mandarin and Russian.