Commuters wear protective face masks in Tokyo on July 30. Japan might be a close ally of the United States but Japanese investors, who have historically been big buyers of Treasuries, are not charities. Photo: Reuters Commuters wear protective face masks in Tokyo on July 30. Japan might be a close ally of the United States but Japanese investors, who have historically been big buyers of Treasuries, are not charities. Photo: Reuters
Commuters wear protective face masks in Tokyo on July 30. Japan might be a close ally of the United States but Japanese investors, who have historically been big buyers of Treasuries, are not charities. Photo: Reuters
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

Why a struggling Japan may have no choice but to put up with a stronger yen

  • Tokyo can do little about US dollar weakness and fading confidence as Treasuries become less attractive, especially when the Trump administration is sensitive about countries weakening their currencies against the dollar

Commuters wear protective face masks in Tokyo on July 30. Japan might be a close ally of the United States but Japanese investors, who have historically been big buyers of Treasuries, are not charities. Photo: Reuters Commuters wear protective face masks in Tokyo on July 30. Japan might be a close ally of the United States but Japanese investors, who have historically been big buyers of Treasuries, are not charities. Photo: Reuters
Commuters wear protective face masks in Tokyo on July 30. Japan might be a close ally of the United States but Japanese investors, who have historically been big buyers of Treasuries, are not charities. Photo: Reuters
READ FULL ARTICLE
Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.