People cross a street in Hong Kong’s business district Central in May 2017. Hong Kong’s low fertility rate and ageing society is a cause for concern. Photo: Fung Chang People cross a street in Hong Kong’s business district Central in May 2017. Hong Kong’s low fertility rate and ageing society is a cause for concern. Photo: Fung Chang
People cross a street in Hong Kong’s business district Central in May 2017. Hong Kong’s low fertility rate and ageing society is a cause for concern. Photo: Fung Chang
Paul Yip
Opinion

Opinion

Paul Yip

Hong Kong, facing an ageing society and brain drain, must act now to retain talent

  • Hong Kong low fertility rate, declining inward migration and increasing outflow, and ageing society do not bode well for the city’s future. The government must make nurturing and attracting talent a priority

People cross a street in Hong Kong’s business district Central in May 2017. Hong Kong’s low fertility rate and ageing society is a cause for concern. Photo: Fung Chang People cross a street in Hong Kong’s business district Central in May 2017. Hong Kong’s low fertility rate and ageing society is a cause for concern. Photo: Fung Chang
People cross a street in Hong Kong’s business district Central in May 2017. Hong Kong’s low fertility rate and ageing society is a cause for concern. Photo: Fung Chang
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Paul Yip

Paul Yip

Paul Yip is the founding director of the Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention at the University of Hong Kong, and a professor at the university's Department of Social Work and Social Administration. His interests include suicide prevention, population health and poverty research. He serves as the secretary general of the Asian Population Association and the research chair of the Family Planning Association of Hong Kong. He was a part-time member of the Central Policy Unit and a member of the Hong Kong government's Steering Committee on Population Policy.