A person walks through a quiet Times Square in New York on August 24. Data shows that the number of new Covid-19 cases reported each day in the US since the beginning of the outbreak has begun to edge lower. Photo: EPA-EFE A person walks through a quiet Times Square in New York on August 24. Data shows that the number of new Covid-19 cases reported each day in the US since the beginning of the outbreak has begun to edge lower. Photo: EPA-EFE
A person walks through a quiet Times Square in New York on August 24. Data shows that the number of new Covid-19 cases reported each day in the US since the beginning of the outbreak has begun to edge lower. Photo: EPA-EFE
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

US dollar weakness won’t last. Signs show a turnaround is due

  • In an evolving situation, dollar bears have to decide if it still makes sense to buy another currency in preference to the dollar
  • While Chinese data may justify yuan strength versus the dollar, European data does not quite justify euro strength

A person walks through a quiet Times Square in New York on August 24. Data shows that the number of new Covid-19 cases reported each day in the US since the beginning of the outbreak has begun to edge lower. Photo: EPA-EFE A person walks through a quiet Times Square in New York on August 24. Data shows that the number of new Covid-19 cases reported each day in the US since the beginning of the outbreak has begun to edge lower. Photo: EPA-EFE
A person walks through a quiet Times Square in New York on August 24. Data shows that the number of new Covid-19 cases reported each day in the US since the beginning of the outbreak has begun to edge lower. Photo: EPA-EFE
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Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.