Members of Hong Kong’s uniformed services march next to a banner supporting the new national security law at the end of a flag-raising ceremony to mark the 23rd anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover from Britain to China on July 1. Photo: AFP Members of Hong Kong’s uniformed services march next to a banner supporting the new national security law at the end of a flag-raising ceremony to mark the 23rd anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover from Britain to China on July 1. Photo: AFP
Members of Hong Kong’s uniformed services march next to a banner supporting the new national security law at the end of a flag-raising ceremony to mark the 23rd anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover from Britain to China on July 1. Photo: AFP
Frank Ching
Opinion

Opinion

Frank Ching

How the national security law draws Hong Kong closer to mainland China

  • The pressure exerted on prominent businesspeople and companies to toe the line and the new law’s omission of two rights guaranteed by the Basic Law make it clear that Hong Kong’s journey towards resembling the mainland is well under way

Members of Hong Kong’s uniformed services march next to a banner supporting the new national security law at the end of a flag-raising ceremony to mark the 23rd anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover from Britain to China on July 1. Photo: AFP Members of Hong Kong’s uniformed services march next to a banner supporting the new national security law at the end of a flag-raising ceremony to mark the 23rd anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover from Britain to China on July 1. Photo: AFP
Members of Hong Kong’s uniformed services march next to a banner supporting the new national security law at the end of a flag-raising ceremony to mark the 23rd anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover from Britain to China on July 1. Photo: AFP
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Frank Ching

Frank Ching

Frank Ching opened The Wall Street Journal’s bureau in Beijing in 1979 when the U.S. and China established diplomatic relations. Before that, he was with The New York Times in New York for 10 years. After Beijing, he wrote the book Ancestors and later joined the Far Eastern Economic Review.