India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe share a light moment in a hotel garden in Yamanakako village, Yamanashi prefecture, Japan, in October 2018. Photo: AP India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe share a light moment in a hotel garden in Yamanakako village, Yamanashi prefecture, Japan, in October 2018. Photo: AP
India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe share a light moment in a hotel garden in Yamanakako village, Yamanashi prefecture, Japan, in October 2018. Photo: AP
Rupakjyoti Borah
Opinion

Opinion

Eye on Asia by Rupakjyoti Borah

With Shinzo Abe’s resignation, India loses its best friend and ally in Japan

  • Under Abe, the biggest champion of relations between the two nations, Japan has become a vital investor in India and a major strategic ally. It will be no easy task for New Delhi to nurture a similar friendship with Abe’s successor

India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe share a light moment in a hotel garden in Yamanakako village, Yamanashi prefecture, Japan, in October 2018. Photo: AP India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe share a light moment in a hotel garden in Yamanakako village, Yamanashi prefecture, Japan, in October 2018. Photo: AP
India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe share a light moment in a hotel garden in Yamanakako village, Yamanashi prefecture, Japan, in October 2018. Photo: AP
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Rupakjyoti Borah

Rupakjyoti Borah

Dr Rupakjyoti Borah is a senior research fellow at the Japan Forum for Strategic Studies, Tokyo. His forthcoming book is The Strategic Relations between India, the United States and Japan in the Indo-Pacific: When Three is Not a Crowd. He has also authored two other books. He has been a visiting fellow at the University of Cambridge, the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA), Japan, and the Australian National University. Twitter @rupakj