China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi meets US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on the sidelines of the 52nd Asean Foreign Ministers' Meeting in Bangkok on August 1, 2019. Photo: AFP China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi meets US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on the sidelines of the 52nd Asean Foreign Ministers' Meeting in Bangkok on August 1, 2019. Photo: AFP
China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi meets US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on the sidelines of the 52nd Asean Foreign Ministers' Meeting in Bangkok on August 1, 2019. Photo: AFP
Anson Au
Opinion

Opinion

Anson Au

Why the US footprint in Asia looks set to shrink

  • The blow to globalisation dealt by the coronavirus will be exacerbated by US presidential candidates running on protectionist platforms. The result may be a reduction of American influence in Asia, with China gaining ground

China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi meets US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on the sidelines of the 52nd Asean Foreign Ministers' Meeting in Bangkok on August 1, 2019. Photo: AFP China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi meets US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on the sidelines of the 52nd Asean Foreign Ministers' Meeting in Bangkok on August 1, 2019. Photo: AFP
China’s Foreign Minister Wang Yi meets US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on the sidelines of the 52nd Asean Foreign Ministers' Meeting in Bangkok on August 1, 2019. Photo: AFP
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Anson Au

Anson Au

Anson Au is a PhD candidate in sociology at the University of Toronto. Award-winning author of over 30 academic research articles, he is an expert in professions, organisations, and social and economic networks, particularly in East Asia. He has previously held visiting appointments at the National Sun Yat-Sen University in Taiwan, Seoul National University and Yonsei University in South Korea, Harbin Institute of Technology in China, and University of Malaya in Malaysia.