Police officers stand by to stop and search people around Mong Kok on the first anniversary of the August 31 incident at Prince Edward MTR station. Photo: Winson Wong Police officers stand by to stop and search people around Mong Kok on the first anniversary of the August 31 incident at Prince Edward MTR station. Photo: Winson Wong
Police officers stand by to stop and search people around Mong Kok on the first anniversary of the August 31 incident at Prince Edward MTR station. Photo: Winson Wong
Michael Chugani
Opinion

Opinion

Michael Chugani

The national security law hasn’t brought back the old Hong Kong. Rather, it has created a new, unfamiliar place

  • Peace has been restored to the city, but at what cost when people cannot even place floral tributes outside an MTR station?
  • The new law has only instilled fear and Hong Kong can never be at peace with itself until the underlying causes of last summer’s uprising are addressed

Police officers stand by to stop and search people around Mong Kok on the first anniversary of the August 31 incident at Prince Edward MTR station. Photo: Winson Wong Police officers stand by to stop and search people around Mong Kok on the first anniversary of the August 31 incident at Prince Edward MTR station. Photo: Winson Wong
Police officers stand by to stop and search people around Mong Kok on the first anniversary of the August 31 incident at Prince Edward MTR station. Photo: Winson Wong
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Michael Chugani

Michael Chugani

Michael Chugani is a Hong Kong journalist and TV show host