A boy eats ice cream near Victoria Harbour in Hong Kong on July 31, 2017, when the Observatory issued a “very hot” weather warning. This year, Hong Kong experienced its hottest July since records began. Photo: Felix Wong A boy eats ice cream near Victoria Harbour in Hong Kong on July 31, 2017, when the Observatory issued a “very hot” weather warning. This year, Hong Kong experienced its hottest July since records began. Photo: Felix Wong
A boy eats ice cream near Victoria Harbour in Hong Kong on July 31, 2017, when the Observatory issued a “very hot” weather warning. This year, Hong Kong experienced its hottest July since records began. Photo: Felix Wong
Jiseok Kim
Opinion

Opinion

Eye on Asia by Jiseok Kim

After Yangtze River floods and Hong Kong’s hottest July, East Asia must heed EU insurers’ climate change call

  • European insurers have called on the European Union to do more to adapt to climate change
  • East Asia, which accounts for a third of global carbon emissions, must also craft pre-disaster strategies

A boy eats ice cream near Victoria Harbour in Hong Kong on July 31, 2017, when the Observatory issued a “very hot” weather warning. This year, Hong Kong experienced its hottest July since records began. Photo: Felix Wong A boy eats ice cream near Victoria Harbour in Hong Kong on July 31, 2017, when the Observatory issued a “very hot” weather warning. This year, Hong Kong experienced its hottest July since records began. Photo: Felix Wong
A boy eats ice cream near Victoria Harbour in Hong Kong on July 31, 2017, when the Observatory issued a “very hot” weather warning. This year, Hong Kong experienced its hottest July since records began. Photo: Felix Wong
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Jiseok Kim

Jiseok Kim

Jiseok Kim is a climate and energy specialist with Greenpeace East Asia.