While there is some encouraging news of reduced rates of suicide among young people in Hong Kong, there remains much work to be done in increasing access to mental health resources and mitigating the impact of the pandemic. Photo: Shutterstock While there is some encouraging news of reduced rates of suicide among young people in Hong Kong, there remains much work to be done in increasing access to mental health resources and mitigating the impact of the pandemic. Photo: Shutterstock
While there is some encouraging news of reduced rates of suicide among young people in Hong Kong, there remains much work to be done in increasing access to mental health resources and mitigating the impact of the pandemic. Photo: Shutterstock
Paul Yip
Opinion

Opinion

Paul Yip

How Hong Kong’s suicide prevention efforts can help reduce the global impact of Covid-19 on mental health

  • Hong Kong has faced many challenges in 2020 and its strong social support networks and resilience learned from Sars can help inform global efforts to better understand the impact of the pandemic on suicide and mental health

While there is some encouraging news of reduced rates of suicide among young people in Hong Kong, there remains much work to be done in increasing access to mental health resources and mitigating the impact of the pandemic. Photo: Shutterstock While there is some encouraging news of reduced rates of suicide among young people in Hong Kong, there remains much work to be done in increasing access to mental health resources and mitigating the impact of the pandemic. Photo: Shutterstock
While there is some encouraging news of reduced rates of suicide among young people in Hong Kong, there remains much work to be done in increasing access to mental health resources and mitigating the impact of the pandemic. Photo: Shutterstock
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Paul Yip

Paul Yip

Paul Yip is the founding director of the Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention at the University of Hong Kong, and a professor at the university's Department of Social Work and Social Administration. His interests include suicide prevention, population health and poverty research. He serves as the secretary general of the Asian Population Association and the research chair of the Family Planning Association of Hong Kong. He was a part-time member of the Central Policy Unit and a member of the Hong Kong government's Steering Committee on Population Policy.