Workers iron shirts in an apparel factory in Haian city, in east China’s Jiangsu province. While China has lost market share in sectors such as apparel exports, it has still managed to contribute far more to overall export growth than any other economy. Photo: AP Workers iron shirts in an apparel factory in Haian city, in east China’s Jiangsu province. While China has lost market share in sectors such as apparel exports, it has still managed to contribute far more to overall export growth than any other economy. Photo: AP
Workers iron shirts in an apparel factory in Haian city, in east China’s Jiangsu province. While China has lost market share in sectors such as apparel exports, it has still managed to contribute far more to overall export growth than any other economy. Photo: AP
Yukon Huang
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Yukon Huang and Jeremy Smith

Why trade will continue to power China, even as it tries to look inward

  • While the heyday of China’s export-led growth may have passed and the ‘dual circulation’ strategy emphasises giving greater play to domestic growth drivers, the continued impact of trade may not be as bleak as some experts have suggested

Workers iron shirts in an apparel factory in Haian city, in east China’s Jiangsu province. While China has lost market share in sectors such as apparel exports, it has still managed to contribute far more to overall export growth than any other economy. Photo: AP Workers iron shirts in an apparel factory in Haian city, in east China’s Jiangsu province. While China has lost market share in sectors such as apparel exports, it has still managed to contribute far more to overall export growth than any other economy. Photo: AP
Workers iron shirts in an apparel factory in Haian city, in east China’s Jiangsu province. While China has lost market share in sectors such as apparel exports, it has still managed to contribute far more to overall export growth than any other economy. Photo: AP
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Yukon Huang

Yukon Huang

Yukon Huang is a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment and author of "Cracking the China Conundrum – Why Conventional Economic Wisdom Is Wrong".

Jeremy Smith

Jeremy Smith

Jeremy Smith is a junior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.