A Unicef health worker administers a vaccination to a child during an anti-polio campaign at a health centre in Sanaa, Yemen, on November 27, 2018. The UN and its agencies continue to do indispensable work around the world despite its members and donors consistently overpromising and underfunding its operations. Photo: EPA A Unicef health worker administers a vaccination to a child during an anti-polio campaign at a health centre in Sanaa, Yemen, on November 27, 2018. The UN and its agencies continue to do indispensable work around the world despite its members and donors consistently overpromising and underfunding its operations. Photo: EPA
A Unicef health worker administers a vaccination to a child during an anti-polio campaign at a health centre in Sanaa, Yemen, on November 27, 2018. The UN and its agencies continue to do indispensable work around the world despite its members and donors consistently overpromising and underfunding its operations. Photo: EPA
Mark S. Cogan
Opinion

Opinion

Mark S. Cogan

At 75, is the United Nations still relevant or necessary?

  • Legitimate criticism and lingering questions surround the UN, even as it makes important progress in areas mostly unseen and vastly under-reported
  • Instead of using the UN as a scapegoat for political failures, criticism should be turned on to states that overpromise and underfund humanitarian operations

A Unicef health worker administers a vaccination to a child during an anti-polio campaign at a health centre in Sanaa, Yemen, on November 27, 2018. The UN and its agencies continue to do indispensable work around the world despite its members and donors consistently overpromising and underfunding its operations. Photo: EPA A Unicef health worker administers a vaccination to a child during an anti-polio campaign at a health centre in Sanaa, Yemen, on November 27, 2018. The UN and its agencies continue to do indispensable work around the world despite its members and donors consistently overpromising and underfunding its operations. Photo: EPA
A Unicef health worker administers a vaccination to a child during an anti-polio campaign at a health centre in Sanaa, Yemen, on November 27, 2018. The UN and its agencies continue to do indispensable work around the world despite its members and donors consistently overpromising and underfunding its operations. Photo: EPA
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Mark S. Cogan

Mark S. Cogan

Mark S. Cogan is an Associate Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at Kansai Gaidai University in Osaka, Japan. He is a former communications specialist with the United Nations in Southeast Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, and the Middle East.