Fast-ageing demographics mean that Hong Kong’s workforce is getting older, with the median age last year being 45.5 years and that is predicted to rise to 52.5 in 2039 and 57.4 in 2069. Photo: Jonathan Wong Fast-ageing demographics mean that Hong Kong’s workforce is getting older, with the median age last year being 45.5 years and that is predicted to rise to 52.5 in 2039 and 57.4 in 2069. Photo: Jonathan Wong
Fast-ageing demographics mean that Hong Kong’s workforce is getting older, with the median age last year being 45.5 years and that is predicted to rise to 52.5 in 2039 and 57.4 in 2069. Photo: Jonathan Wong
SCMP Editorial
Opinion

Opinion

Editorial by SCMP Editorial

Ageing Hong Kong risks loss of competitive edge if it does not transform

  • With the city’s population forecast to decline after 2041 through falling births and rising deaths, every effort must be made to ensure there are enough educated and trained people ready to work

Fast-ageing demographics mean that Hong Kong’s workforce is getting older, with the median age last year being 45.5 years and that is predicted to rise to 52.5 in 2039 and 57.4 in 2069. Photo: Jonathan Wong Fast-ageing demographics mean that Hong Kong’s workforce is getting older, with the median age last year being 45.5 years and that is predicted to rise to 52.5 in 2039 and 57.4 in 2069. Photo: Jonathan Wong
Fast-ageing demographics mean that Hong Kong’s workforce is getting older, with the median age last year being 45.5 years and that is predicted to rise to 52.5 in 2039 and 57.4 in 2069. Photo: Jonathan Wong
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