A migrant labourer waits for work on the street in Beijing on August 17. The prospect of a protracted recession and a jobless recovery thereafter could make life especially tough for firms and workers not integrated into the digital world. Photo: EPA A migrant labourer waits for work on the street in Beijing on August 17. The prospect of a protracted recession and a jobless recovery thereafter could make life especially tough for firms and workers not integrated into the digital world. Photo: EPA
A migrant labourer waits for work on the street in Beijing on August 17. The prospect of a protracted recession and a jobless recovery thereafter could make life especially tough for firms and workers not integrated into the digital world. Photo: EPA
Mark Clifford
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Mark Clifford

Long, hard coronavirus recovery ahead for Asian companies, especially those outside the digital economy

  • Many executives believe economies will not return to pre-pandemic levels in 2021, suggesting little faith in prospects for a V-shaped recovery
  • Workers and firms not in the digital space face an even harder road, complicated by Covid-19, Sino-US tensions and the growing impact of climate change

A migrant labourer waits for work on the street in Beijing on August 17. The prospect of a protracted recession and a jobless recovery thereafter could make life especially tough for firms and workers not integrated into the digital world. Photo: EPA A migrant labourer waits for work on the street in Beijing on August 17. The prospect of a protracted recession and a jobless recovery thereafter could make life especially tough for firms and workers not integrated into the digital world. Photo: EPA
A migrant labourer waits for work on the street in Beijing on August 17. The prospect of a protracted recession and a jobless recovery thereafter could make life especially tough for firms and workers not integrated into the digital world. Photo: EPA
READ FULL ARTICLE
Mark Clifford

Mark Clifford

Mark L. Clifford is executive director of the Asia Business Council and author of "The Greening of Asia: The Business Case for Solving Asia’s Environmental Emergency". Previously he was editor-in-chief of the South China Morning Post, publisher and editor-in-chief of The Standard, and Asia regional editor for BusinessWeek. He graduated from the University of California, Berkeley and was a Walter Bagehot Fellow at Columbia University. He has lived in Hong Kong since 1992. www.markclifford.org