A statue of Lady Justice on top of the Court of Final Appeal in Central district, Hong Kong. The sweeping national security law, passed by Beijing in June, has raised concerns among some about its potential impact on judicial independence. Photo: EPA-EFE A statue of Lady Justice on top of the Court of Final Appeal in Central district, Hong Kong. The sweeping national security law, passed by Beijing in June, has raised concerns among some about its potential impact on judicial independence. Photo: EPA-EFE
A statue of Lady Justice on top of the Court of Final Appeal in Central district, Hong Kong. The sweeping national security law, passed by Beijing in June, has raised concerns among some about its potential impact on judicial independence. Photo: EPA-EFE
SCMP Editorial
Opinion

Opinion

Editorial by SCMP Editorial

Reassurance required by foreign judges in Hong Kong in wake of resignation

  • Departure of Australian from city’s top court, reportedly over the national security legislation, is a matter of concern and it is essential such top legal minds remain in place and help ensure the rule of law is observed

A statue of Lady Justice on top of the Court of Final Appeal in Central district, Hong Kong. The sweeping national security law, passed by Beijing in June, has raised concerns among some about its potential impact on judicial independence. Photo: EPA-EFE A statue of Lady Justice on top of the Court of Final Appeal in Central district, Hong Kong. The sweeping national security law, passed by Beijing in June, has raised concerns among some about its potential impact on judicial independence. Photo: EPA-EFE
A statue of Lady Justice on top of the Court of Final Appeal in Central district, Hong Kong. The sweeping national security law, passed by Beijing in June, has raised concerns among some about its potential impact on judicial independence. Photo: EPA-EFE
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