A SinoVac lab employee works at a factory producing its Sars-CoV-2 vaccine in Beijing on September 24. Plans to rely on herd immunity to contain the spread of Covid-19 would require more than 5 billion people worldwide to have had the infection before it would take effect. Photo: AP A SinoVac lab employee works at a factory producing its Sars-CoV-2 vaccine in Beijing on September 24. Plans to rely on herd immunity to contain the spread of Covid-19 would require more than 5 billion people worldwide to have had the infection before it would take effect. Photo: AP
A SinoVac lab employee works at a factory producing its Sars-CoV-2 vaccine in Beijing on September 24. Plans to rely on herd immunity to contain the spread of Covid-19 would require more than 5 billion people worldwide to have had the infection before it would take effect. Photo: AP
Soumya Swaminathan
Opinion

Opinion

Soumya Swaminathan

Without a vaccine, chasing herd immunity to stop coronavirus is doomed to fail

  • To achieve herd immunity for Covid-19, at least 60 to 70 per cent of the global population would need to have had the infection, which, without a vaccine, may take years
  • Until we have an effective vaccine, we have to outsmart this virus by understanding where and how it spreads and not giving it a chance to do so

A SinoVac lab employee works at a factory producing its Sars-CoV-2 vaccine in Beijing on September 24. Plans to rely on herd immunity to contain the spread of Covid-19 would require more than 5 billion people worldwide to have had the infection before it would take effect. Photo: AP A SinoVac lab employee works at a factory producing its Sars-CoV-2 vaccine in Beijing on September 24. Plans to rely on herd immunity to contain the spread of Covid-19 would require more than 5 billion people worldwide to have had the infection before it would take effect. Photo: AP
A SinoVac lab employee works at a factory producing its Sars-CoV-2 vaccine in Beijing on September 24. Plans to rely on herd immunity to contain the spread of Covid-19 would require more than 5 billion people worldwide to have had the infection before it would take effect. Photo: AP
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