A member of staff works between storage shelves at a logistics centre in Shanghai on June 5. The trade war and Covid-19 have merely accelerated the long-term trend of supply chain reconfiguration. Photo: Xinhua A member of staff works between storage shelves at a logistics centre in Shanghai on June 5. The trade war and Covid-19 have merely accelerated the long-term trend of supply chain reconfiguration. Photo: Xinhua
A member of staff works between storage shelves at a logistics centre in Shanghai on June 5. The trade war and Covid-19 have merely accelerated the long-term trend of supply chain reconfiguration. Photo: Xinhua
Simon Lacey
Opinion

Opinion

Simon Lacey

Why economic decoupling to contain or punish China is doomed to fail

  • Economic decoupling is neither new nor radical. Rather, it represents the march of companies seeking new markets and optimising costs, while minimising the likelihood of disruption
  • China is simply too big a market and too integrated into the global economy to be contained or cut off

A member of staff works between storage shelves at a logistics centre in Shanghai on June 5. The trade war and Covid-19 have merely accelerated the long-term trend of supply chain reconfiguration. Photo: Xinhua A member of staff works between storage shelves at a logistics centre in Shanghai on June 5. The trade war and Covid-19 have merely accelerated the long-term trend of supply chain reconfiguration. Photo: Xinhua
A member of staff works between storage shelves at a logistics centre in Shanghai on June 5. The trade war and Covid-19 have merely accelerated the long-term trend of supply chain reconfiguration. Photo: Xinhua
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