People gather at an opposition rally to reject the presidential election results in Minsk, Belarus, on October 4. The size and resilience of the protests suggest the people of Belarus are no longer satisfied with their managed democracy under President Alexander Lukashenko. Photo: Reuters People gather at an opposition rally to reject the presidential election results in Minsk, Belarus, on October 4. The size and resilience of the protests suggest the people of Belarus are no longer satisfied with their managed democracy under President Alexander Lukashenko. Photo: Reuters
People gather at an opposition rally to reject the presidential election results in Minsk, Belarus, on October 4. The size and resilience of the protests suggest the people of Belarus are no longer satisfied with their managed democracy under President Alexander Lukashenko. Photo: Reuters
Peter G. de Krassel
Opinion

Opinion

Peter G. de Krassel

Real democracy is still going strong, despite pandemic crisis and US election ugliness

  • The much-discussed collapse of liberal democracy has raised questions in some quarters about whether managed democracy or authoritarian rule is superior
  • However, evidence from the US, Belarus and Kyrgyzstan suggest real democracy is alive and well as people turn out in force to support the rule of law

People gather at an opposition rally to reject the presidential election results in Minsk, Belarus, on October 4. The size and resilience of the protests suggest the people of Belarus are no longer satisfied with their managed democracy under President Alexander Lukashenko. Photo: Reuters People gather at an opposition rally to reject the presidential election results in Minsk, Belarus, on October 4. The size and resilience of the protests suggest the people of Belarus are no longer satisfied with their managed democracy under President Alexander Lukashenko. Photo: Reuters
People gather at an opposition rally to reject the presidential election results in Minsk, Belarus, on October 4. The size and resilience of the protests suggest the people of Belarus are no longer satisfied with their managed democracy under President Alexander Lukashenko. Photo: Reuters
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