The Shenzhen River dividing Hong Kong from Shenzhen. “One country, two systems” was designed to keep Hong Kong’s “well water” from mixing with the mainland’s “river water”. Thus, allowing Hongkongers to vote from the mainland raises complicated political questions. Photo: Reuters The Shenzhen River dividing Hong Kong from Shenzhen. “One country, two systems” was designed to keep Hong Kong’s “well water” from mixing with the mainland’s “river water”. Thus, allowing Hongkongers to vote from the mainland raises complicated political questions. Photo: Reuters
The Shenzhen River dividing Hong Kong from Shenzhen. “One country, two systems” was designed to keep Hong Kong’s “well water” from mixing with the mainland’s “river water”. Thus, allowing Hongkongers to vote from the mainland raises complicated political questions. Photo: Reuters
Alice Wu
Opinion

Opinion

Alice Wu

Why Hongkongers voting from the mainland might be more trouble than it’s worth

  • The absentee voting proposal calls into question the limits of ‘one country, two systems’, and the complexities go far beyond mere technicalities like how to validate voter identification

The Shenzhen River dividing Hong Kong from Shenzhen. “One country, two systems” was designed to keep Hong Kong’s “well water” from mixing with the mainland’s “river water”. Thus, allowing Hongkongers to vote from the mainland raises complicated political questions. Photo: Reuters The Shenzhen River dividing Hong Kong from Shenzhen. “One country, two systems” was designed to keep Hong Kong’s “well water” from mixing with the mainland’s “river water”. Thus, allowing Hongkongers to vote from the mainland raises complicated political questions. Photo: Reuters
The Shenzhen River dividing Hong Kong from Shenzhen. “One country, two systems” was designed to keep Hong Kong’s “well water” from mixing with the mainland’s “river water”. Thus, allowing Hongkongers to vote from the mainland raises complicated political questions. Photo: Reuters
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