People wear masks while shopping at a Walmart store in North Brunswick, New Jersey, on July 20. Americans already struggling with high unemployment look set to lose what little government aid they have when the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act expires on December 26, generating more pressure on the Fed to fill the gap with monetary policy. Photo: Reuters People wear masks while shopping at a Walmart store in North Brunswick, New Jersey, on July 20. Americans already struggling with high unemployment look set to lose what little government aid they have when the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act expires on December 26, generating more pressure on the Fed to fill the gap with monetary policy. Photo: Reuters
People wear masks while shopping at a Walmart store in North Brunswick, New Jersey, on July 20. Americans already struggling with high unemployment look set to lose what little government aid they have when the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act expires on December 26, generating more pressure on the Fed to fill the gap with monetary policy. Photo: Reuters
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

Coronavirus’ continued spread and a split Congress threaten the US dollar’s value

  • Good news is in short supply as Covid-19 cases and deaths soar, the US economic recovery falters and Congress appears unable to help those in need
  • The Federal Reserve is likely to face pressure to keep its policy settings ultra-accommodative, risking further US dollar weakness

People wear masks while shopping at a Walmart store in North Brunswick, New Jersey, on July 20. Americans already struggling with high unemployment look set to lose what little government aid they have when the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act expires on December 26, generating more pressure on the Fed to fill the gap with monetary policy. Photo: Reuters People wear masks while shopping at a Walmart store in North Brunswick, New Jersey, on July 20. Americans already struggling with high unemployment look set to lose what little government aid they have when the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act expires on December 26, generating more pressure on the Fed to fill the gap with monetary policy. Photo: Reuters
People wear masks while shopping at a Walmart store in North Brunswick, New Jersey, on July 20. Americans already struggling with high unemployment look set to lose what little government aid they have when the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act expires on December 26, generating more pressure on the Fed to fill the gap with monetary policy. Photo: Reuters
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Neal Kimberley

Neal Kimberley

UK-based Neal Kimberley has been active in the financial markets since 1985. Having worked in sales and trading in the dealing rooms of major banks in London for many years, he moved to ThomsonReuters in 2009 to provide market analysis. He has been contributing to the Post since 2015 and writes about macroeconomics from a market perspective, with a particular emphasis on currencies and interest rates.