People hold up posters against the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) during a protest in Madrid, Spain, on October 15, 2016. Attempts to revive the deal under US President-elect Joe Biden are likely to receive intense resistance from politicians and the public on both sides of the Atlantic. Photo: AP People hold up posters against the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) during a protest in Madrid, Spain, on October 15, 2016. Attempts to revive the deal under US President-elect Joe Biden are likely to receive intense resistance from politicians and the public on both sides of the Atlantic. Photo: AP
People hold up posters against the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) during a protest in Madrid, Spain, on October 15, 2016. Attempts to revive the deal under US President-elect Joe Biden are likely to receive intense resistance from politicians and the public on both sides of the Atlantic. Photo: AP
Martin Murphy
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Martin Murphy

How a US-EU trade deal would bolster democratic values and the global economy

  • Heightened US-EU cooperation will be less about containing others than repositioning the international order around the democratic values and open market rules that have enabled Asia and the global economy to prosper

People hold up posters against the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) during a protest in Madrid, Spain, on October 15, 2016. Attempts to revive the deal under US President-elect Joe Biden are likely to receive intense resistance from politicians and the public on both sides of the Atlantic. Photo: AP People hold up posters against the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) during a protest in Madrid, Spain, on October 15, 2016. Attempts to revive the deal under US President-elect Joe Biden are likely to receive intense resistance from politicians and the public on both sides of the Atlantic. Photo: AP
People hold up posters against the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) during a protest in Madrid, Spain, on October 15, 2016. Attempts to revive the deal under US President-elect Joe Biden are likely to receive intense resistance from politicians and the public on both sides of the Atlantic. Photo: AP
READ FULL ARTICLE
Martin Murphy

Martin Murphy

Martin Murphy is a former US diplomat and banker with 25 years’ experience in EU and Asian affairs. He is the author of Europe 1992: A Business Guide to US Government Resources.