The Chinese national flag and the Hong Kong flag fly outside the Court of Final Appeal in Hong Kong in July. Beijing’s call for judicial reform has clarified that the finality in the “power of final adjudication” of Hong Kong as vested in the Court of Final Appeal had been misunderstood. Photo: AFP The Chinese national flag and the Hong Kong flag fly outside the Court of Final Appeal in Hong Kong in July. Beijing’s call for judicial reform has clarified that the finality in the “power of final adjudication” of Hong Kong as vested in the Court of Final Appeal had been misunderstood. Photo: AFP
The Chinese national flag and the Hong Kong flag fly outside the Court of Final Appeal in Hong Kong in July. Beijing’s call for judicial reform has clarified that the finality in the “power of final adjudication” of Hong Kong as vested in the Court of Final Appeal had been misunderstood. Photo: AFP
Phil C. W. Chan
Opinion

Opinion

Phil C. W. Chan

Beijing’s call for judicial reform spells the end of the Hong Kong system

  • The move to align Hong Kong’s common law system with mainland expectations cannot be said to be a surprise, as Beijing has been consistent in its pronouncements on Hong Kong’s place in China

The Chinese national flag and the Hong Kong flag fly outside the Court of Final Appeal in Hong Kong in July. Beijing’s call for judicial reform has clarified that the finality in the “power of final adjudication” of Hong Kong as vested in the Court of Final Appeal had been misunderstood. Photo: AFP The Chinese national flag and the Hong Kong flag fly outside the Court of Final Appeal in Hong Kong in July. Beijing’s call for judicial reform has clarified that the finality in the “power of final adjudication” of Hong Kong as vested in the Court of Final Appeal had been misunderstood. Photo: AFP
The Chinese national flag and the Hong Kong flag fly outside the Court of Final Appeal in Hong Kong in July. Beijing’s call for judicial reform has clarified that the finality in the “power of final adjudication” of Hong Kong as vested in the Court of Final Appeal had been misunderstood. Photo: AFP
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Phil C. W. Chan

Phil C. W. Chan

Phil C.W. Chan is a scholar in public law, human rights, international law and global governance. His books include China, State Sovereignty and International Legal Order (2015), Protection of Sexual Minorities since Stonewall: Progress and Stalemate in Developed and Developing Countries (2010), and Equality in Asia-Pacific: Reality or a Contradiction in Terms? (2007). He holds a PhD in international law and Chinese law from the National University of Singapore and law degrees from the University of Hong Kong and the University of Durham.