Joe Biden, then the presumptive Democratic Party presidential nominee, delivers a speech explaining his “Build Back Better” plan, at a community centre in Wilmington, Delaware, on July 28. Photo: Getty Images/AFP Joe Biden, then the presumptive Democratic Party presidential nominee, delivers a speech explaining his “Build Back Better” plan, at a community centre in Wilmington, Delaware, on July 28. Photo: Getty Images/AFP
Joe Biden, then the presumptive Democratic Party presidential nominee, delivers a speech explaining his “Build Back Better” plan, at a community centre in Wilmington, Delaware, on July 28. Photo: Getty Images/AFP
Dani Rodrik
Opinion

Opinion

Dani Rodrik

Why Joe Biden should not look to tax incentives to bring back the good jobs

  • Tax incentives and open-ended investment subsidies to attract firms to lagging regions are not particularly effective
  • Instead, Biden should invest in sectoral training programmes, which equip workers with skills tailored to the needs of specific industries

Joe Biden, then the presumptive Democratic Party presidential nominee, delivers a speech explaining his “Build Back Better” plan, at a community centre in Wilmington, Delaware, on July 28. Photo: Getty Images/AFP Joe Biden, then the presumptive Democratic Party presidential nominee, delivers a speech explaining his “Build Back Better” plan, at a community centre in Wilmington, Delaware, on July 28. Photo: Getty Images/AFP
Joe Biden, then the presumptive Democratic Party presidential nominee, delivers a speech explaining his “Build Back Better” plan, at a community centre in Wilmington, Delaware, on July 28. Photo: Getty Images/AFP
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Dani Rodrik

Dani Rodrik

Dani Rodrik, a professor of international political economy at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, is the author of Straight Talk on Trade: Ideas for a Sane World Economy.