Traders at the New York Stock Exchange watch President Donald Trump's televised White House news conference on March 18. Trump’s relentless cheerleading for the stock market, taking full credit for its gains, has been a hallmark of his presidency. Photo: AP Traders at the New York Stock Exchange watch President Donald Trump's televised White House news conference on March 18. Trump’s relentless cheerleading for the stock market, taking full credit for its gains, has been a hallmark of his presidency. Photo: AP
Traders at the New York Stock Exchange watch President Donald Trump's televised White House news conference on March 18. Trump’s relentless cheerleading for the stock market, taking full credit for its gains, has been a hallmark of his presidency. Photo: AP
Richard Harris
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Richard Harris

Why the coronavirus left stock markets shaken but not stirred in 2020

  • Despite talk of economic destruction, recession, job losses and business closures, most stock markets are likely to end the year on a positive note, buoyed by central bank asset purchases and government debt

Traders at the New York Stock Exchange watch President Donald Trump's televised White House news conference on March 18. Trump’s relentless cheerleading for the stock market, taking full credit for its gains, has been a hallmark of his presidency. Photo: AP Traders at the New York Stock Exchange watch President Donald Trump's televised White House news conference on March 18. Trump’s relentless cheerleading for the stock market, taking full credit for its gains, has been a hallmark of his presidency. Photo: AP
Traders at the New York Stock Exchange watch President Donald Trump's televised White House news conference on March 18. Trump’s relentless cheerleading for the stock market, taking full credit for its gains, has been a hallmark of his presidency. Photo: AP
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Richard Harris

Richard Harris

Richard has pioneered Asian investment management at senior levels for companies such as JP Morgan, Citi, BNY Mellon and several start-ups. He has 40 years of experience in a full range of investment and capital markets activities. He is CEO of Port Shelter Investment Management.