A hard hat is seen on a coffin as protesters gather at an event on December 12 in central London, organised by Justitia Hong Kong, to mourn the loss of Hong Kong's political freedoms. Issues like Hong Kong, Xinjiang, Taiwan and the South China Sea, which are for China issues of sovereignty, are understood by the UK as important issues of international law and human rights. Photo: AFP A hard hat is seen on a coffin as protesters gather at an event on December 12 in central London, organised by Justitia Hong Kong, to mourn the loss of Hong Kong's political freedoms. Issues like Hong Kong, Xinjiang, Taiwan and the South China Sea, which are for China issues of sovereignty, are understood by the UK as important issues of international law and human rights. Photo: AFP
A hard hat is seen on a coffin as protesters gather at an event on December 12 in central London, organised by Justitia Hong Kong, to mourn the loss of Hong Kong's political freedoms. Issues like Hong Kong, Xinjiang, Taiwan and the South China Sea, which are for China issues of sovereignty, are understood by the UK as important issues of international law and human rights. Photo: AFP
Kerry Brown
Opinion

Opinion

Kerry Brown and Evan Fowler

The Sino-British relationship needs more pragmatic engagement, not less

  • Beijing and London have in the past built a relationship guided by a more realistic understanding of their differences in values, and must do so again
  • Distrust is impeding cooperation on issues of common interest, and is detrimental to Britain’s efforts, post Brexit, to navigate a global economy in which China is a central player

A hard hat is seen on a coffin as protesters gather at an event on December 12 in central London, organised by Justitia Hong Kong, to mourn the loss of Hong Kong's political freedoms. Issues like Hong Kong, Xinjiang, Taiwan and the South China Sea, which are for China issues of sovereignty, are understood by the UK as important issues of international law and human rights. Photo: AFP A hard hat is seen on a coffin as protesters gather at an event on December 12 in central London, organised by Justitia Hong Kong, to mourn the loss of Hong Kong's political freedoms. Issues like Hong Kong, Xinjiang, Taiwan and the South China Sea, which are for China issues of sovereignty, are understood by the UK as important issues of international law and human rights. Photo: AFP
A hard hat is seen on a coffin as protesters gather at an event on December 12 in central London, organised by Justitia Hong Kong, to mourn the loss of Hong Kong's political freedoms. Issues like Hong Kong, Xinjiang, Taiwan and the South China Sea, which are for China issues of sovereignty, are understood by the UK as important issues of international law and human rights. Photo: AFP
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Kerry Brown

Kerry Brown

Kerry Brown is professor of Chinese Studies and director of the Lau China Institute at King’s College, London, and an associate on Chatham House’s Asia-Pacific Programme.

Evan Fowler

Evan Fowler

Evan Fowler, a Hongkonger, is an independent researcher on Hong Kong and China affairs, and an associate fellow at the Henry Jackson Society (UK).