Chinese ambassador Gui Congyou has likened Swedish media coverage of China to a lightweight boxer provoking a heavyweight. Photo: EPA-EFE Chinese ambassador Gui Congyou has likened Swedish media coverage of China to a lightweight boxer provoking a heavyweight. Photo: EPA-EFE
Chinese ambassador Gui Congyou has likened Swedish media coverage of China to a lightweight boxer provoking a heavyweight. Photo: EPA-EFE
Sam Olsen
Opinion

Opinion

Sam Olsen

To lead, China must learn how to win friends and stop coming across as a bully

  • As the Sweden example shows, Beijing’s way of dealing with criticism is eroding its soft power. China needs to avoid alienating others and learn how to influence people if it is to cement its place at the top

Chinese ambassador Gui Congyou has likened Swedish media coverage of China to a lightweight boxer provoking a heavyweight. Photo: EPA-EFE Chinese ambassador Gui Congyou has likened Swedish media coverage of China to a lightweight boxer provoking a heavyweight. Photo: EPA-EFE
Chinese ambassador Gui Congyou has likened Swedish media coverage of China to a lightweight boxer provoking a heavyweight. Photo: EPA-EFE
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Sam Olsen

Sam Olsen

Sam Olsen is the co-founder of the strategic consultancy MetisAsia and the author of What China Wants. A former managing director at Kroll, he first visited China in 1996 and has lived in both Hong Kong and Singapore. He has also contributed to UK policy on foreign and trade affairs. Twitter: @samolsenx