The euro-US dollar exchange rate is displayed on a board in London on December 14. The EU is already beginning to balk at the euro’s recent surge, now close to breaking three-year highs at around US$1.25. Photo: EPA-EFE The euro-US dollar exchange rate is displayed on a board in London on December 14. The EU is already beginning to balk at the euro’s recent surge, now close to breaking three-year highs at around US$1.25. Photo: EPA-EFE
The euro-US dollar exchange rate is displayed on a board in London on December 14. The EU is already beginning to balk at the euro’s recent surge, now close to breaking three-year highs at around US$1.25. Photo: EPA-EFE
David Brown
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by David Brown

Why the Fed may be forced to hit the brakes on US dollar slide

  • China and Europe’s patience with renminbi and euro appreciation, respectively, may not last, while incoming Biden team could be less opposed to stronger dollar
  • The Fed’s response will be key, as pressure builds on it to keep the economy from overheating with fiscal policy so loose and interest rates so low

The euro-US dollar exchange rate is displayed on a board in London on December 14. The EU is already beginning to balk at the euro’s recent surge, now close to breaking three-year highs at around US$1.25. Photo: EPA-EFE The euro-US dollar exchange rate is displayed on a board in London on December 14. The EU is already beginning to balk at the euro’s recent surge, now close to breaking three-year highs at around US$1.25. Photo: EPA-EFE
The euro-US dollar exchange rate is displayed on a board in London on December 14. The EU is already beginning to balk at the euro’s recent surge, now close to breaking three-year highs at around US$1.25. Photo: EPA-EFE
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David Brown

David Brown

David Brown is the chief executive of New View Economics. Over a career spanning four decades in London, David held roles as chief economist in a number of international investment banks.