North Korean leader Kim Jong-un attends a military parade on October 11. From Pyongyang’s perspective, the partisan divide in the US reduces the pressure to negotiate. Photo: AFP/KCNA via KNS North Korean leader Kim Jong-un attends a military parade on October 11. From Pyongyang’s perspective, the partisan divide in the US reduces the pressure to negotiate. Photo: AFP/KCNA via KNS
North Korean leader Kim Jong-un attends a military parade on October 11. From Pyongyang’s perspective, the partisan divide in the US reduces the pressure to negotiate. Photo: AFP/KCNA via KNS
Mark Tokola
Opinion

Opinion

Mark Tokola and Juni Kim

How can a divided America hope to build peace on the Korean peninsula?

  • Even if US foreign policy can rise above partisanship, foreign governments are inevitably going to wonder what will happen to their agreements with Washington if there is a change in administration

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un attends a military parade on October 11. From Pyongyang’s perspective, the partisan divide in the US reduces the pressure to negotiate. Photo: AFP/KCNA via KNS North Korean leader Kim Jong-un attends a military parade on October 11. From Pyongyang’s perspective, the partisan divide in the US reduces the pressure to negotiate. Photo: AFP/KCNA via KNS
North Korean leader Kim Jong-un attends a military parade on October 11. From Pyongyang’s perspective, the partisan divide in the US reduces the pressure to negotiate. Photo: AFP/KCNA via KNS
READ FULL ARTICLE
Mark Tokola

Mark Tokola

Mark Tokola is vice-president of the Korea Economic Institute of America in Washington, DC. He retired as a US senior foreign service officer  in 2014.

Juni Kim

Juni Kim

Juni Kim is the senior manager for operations and technology at the Korea Economic Institute of America