British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen meet on December 9 on post-Brexit arrangements. A trade deal was finally reached on December 24. Photo: Getty Images / TNS British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen meet on December 9 on post-Brexit arrangements. A trade deal was finally reached on December 24. Photo: Getty Images / TNS
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen meet on December 9 on post-Brexit arrangements. A trade deal was finally reached on December 24. Photo: Getty Images / TNS
Andrew Hammond
Opinion

Opinion

Andrew Hammond

With Brexit, the UK may be bolstering the EU and seeding its own disintegration

  • While the 2020s could see a more federal, centralised European Union, the opposite may be true for the UK
  • With pressures growing for Scottish independence and potentially even Irish reunification, these are uncertain times for the union of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen meet on December 9 on post-Brexit arrangements. A trade deal was finally reached on December 24. Photo: Getty Images / TNS British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen meet on December 9 on post-Brexit arrangements. A trade deal was finally reached on December 24. Photo: Getty Images / TNS
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen meet on December 9 on post-Brexit arrangements. A trade deal was finally reached on December 24. Photo: Getty Images / TNS
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Andrew Hammond

Andrew Hammond

Andrew Hammond is an associate at LSE IDEAS (the Centre for International Affairs, Diplomacy and Strategy) at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He was formerly a UK goverment special adviser at a time when Britain last held the presidency of the European Union.