A visitor admires exhibits at the National Palace Museum in Taipei, Taiwan, in April 2009. The internationally renowned museum houses artefacts from China’s imperial era. Photo: AP A visitor admires exhibits at the National Palace Museum in Taipei, Taiwan, in April 2009. The internationally renowned museum houses artefacts from China’s imperial era. Photo: AP
A visitor admires exhibits at the National Palace Museum in Taipei, Taiwan, in April 2009. The internationally renowned museum houses artefacts from China’s imperial era. Photo: AP
Chi Wang
Opinion

Opinion

Chi Wang

Why Taiwan’s National Palace Museum controversy is more than a storm in a teacup

  • The museum has once again become intertwined with a larger political and emotional conversation about Taiwanese identity, the legacy of the martial law era and the future of the island

A visitor admires exhibits at the National Palace Museum in Taipei, Taiwan, in April 2009. The internationally renowned museum houses artefacts from China’s imperial era. Photo: AP A visitor admires exhibits at the National Palace Museum in Taipei, Taiwan, in April 2009. The internationally renowned museum houses artefacts from China’s imperial era. Photo: AP
A visitor admires exhibits at the National Palace Museum in Taipei, Taiwan, in April 2009. The internationally renowned museum houses artefacts from China’s imperial era. Photo: AP
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Chi Wang

Chi Wang

Chi Wang, a former head of the Chinese section of the US Library of Congress, is president of the US-China Policy Foundation.