The Golden Bauhinia Square in Hong Kong, seen on July 1 last year. Beijing imposed a national security law on Hong Kong on June 30, which some saw as marking the end of Hong Kong’s high degree of autonomy. Photo: Xinhua The Golden Bauhinia Square in Hong Kong, seen on July 1 last year. Beijing imposed a national security law on Hong Kong on June 30, which some saw as marking the end of Hong Kong’s high degree of autonomy. Photo: Xinhua
The Golden Bauhinia Square in Hong Kong, seen on July 1 last year. Beijing imposed a national security law on Hong Kong on June 30, which some saw as marking the end of Hong Kong’s high degree of autonomy. Photo: Xinhua
Albert Cheng
Opinion

Opinion

Albert Cheng

As Hongkongers leave, will mainland-born elites take a more prominent role in the city’s politics?

  • A new party led by mainland-born businessmen has fuelled fears over Hong Kong’s changing political scene. With anxiety over the national security law expected to spark a wave of migration, the political establishment could see a changing of the guard

The Golden Bauhinia Square in Hong Kong, seen on July 1 last year. Beijing imposed a national security law on Hong Kong on June 30, which some saw as marking the end of Hong Kong’s high degree of autonomy. Photo: Xinhua The Golden Bauhinia Square in Hong Kong, seen on July 1 last year. Beijing imposed a national security law on Hong Kong on June 30, which some saw as marking the end of Hong Kong’s high degree of autonomy. Photo: Xinhua
The Golden Bauhinia Square in Hong Kong, seen on July 1 last year. Beijing imposed a national security law on Hong Kong on June 30, which some saw as marking the end of Hong Kong’s high degree of autonomy. Photo: Xinhua
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Albert Cheng

Albert Cheng

Ir. Albert Cheng is the founder of Digital Broadcasting Corporation Hong Kong Limited, a current affairs commentator and columnist. He was formerly a direct elected Hong Kong SAR legislative councillor. Mr Cheng was voted by Time Magazine in 1997 as one of "the 25 most influential people in new Hong Kong" and selected by Business Week in 1998 as one of "the 50 stars of Asia".