Vu Thi Dinh, a Vietnamese mother, poses with a photograph of her missing teenage daughter Dua and her best friend, at her house in Meo Vac, a mountainous border district between Vietnam’s Ha Giang province and China, on October 27, 2018. Both girls are feared to have been sold as child brides. Photo: AFP Vu Thi Dinh, a Vietnamese mother, poses with a photograph of her missing teenage daughter Dua and her best friend, at her house in Meo Vac, a mountainous border district between Vietnam’s Ha Giang province and China, on October 27, 2018. Both girls are feared to have been sold as child brides. Photo: AFP
Vu Thi Dinh, a Vietnamese mother, poses with a photograph of her missing teenage daughter Dua and her best friend, at her house in Meo Vac, a mountainous border district between Vietnam’s Ha Giang province and China, on October 27, 2018. Both girls are feared to have been sold as child brides. Photo: AFP
Kelley E. Currie
Opinion

Opinion

Kelley E. Currie, John Cotton Richmond and Samuel D. Brownback

How China’s ‘missing women’ problem has fuelled trafficking and forced marriage

  • To prevent trafficking, countries must better train their immigration officers and boost socioeconomic conditions in vulnerable areas, while China should make a sustained effort to punish perpetrators and support victims

Vu Thi Dinh, a Vietnamese mother, poses with a photograph of her missing teenage daughter Dua and her best friend, at her house in Meo Vac, a mountainous border district between Vietnam’s Ha Giang province and China, on October 27, 2018. Both girls are feared to have been sold as child brides. Photo: AFP Vu Thi Dinh, a Vietnamese mother, poses with a photograph of her missing teenage daughter Dua and her best friend, at her house in Meo Vac, a mountainous border district between Vietnam’s Ha Giang province and China, on October 27, 2018. Both girls are feared to have been sold as child brides. Photo: AFP
Vu Thi Dinh, a Vietnamese mother, poses with a photograph of her missing teenage daughter Dua and her best friend, at her house in Meo Vac, a mountainous border district between Vietnam’s Ha Giang province and China, on October 27, 2018. Both girls are feared to have been sold as child brides. Photo: AFP
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Kelley E. Currie

Kelley E. Currie

Kelley E. Currie is US Ambassador at Large for Global Women’s Issues. She serves simultaneously as the US Representative at the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women. Prior to her appointment, she led the Department of State’s Office of Global Criminal Justice (2019) and served under Ambassador Nikki Haley as the United States’ Representative to the UN Economic and Social Council and Alternative Representative to the UN General Assembly (2017-2018).

John Cotton Richmond

John Cotton Richmond

John Cotton Richmond is Ambassador at Large to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons. He co-founded the Human Trafficking Institute and, prior to that, served for more than 10 years as a federal prosecutor in the US Department of Justice’s Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit.

Samuel D. Brownback

Samuel D. Brownback

Samuel D. Brownback is Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom. He served as governor of Kansas from 2011 to 2018. Previously, he served as a US Senator (1996-2011) and a US Representative in the House of Representatives (1995-1996) from Kansas.