Vu Thi Dinh, a Vietnamese mother, poses with a photograph of her missing teenage daughter Dua and her best friend, at her house in Meo Vac, a mountainous border district between Vietnam’s Ha Giang province and China, on October 27, 2018. Both girls are feared to have been sold as child brides. Photo: AFP
Vu Thi Dinh, a Vietnamese mother, poses with a photograph of her missing teenage daughter Dua and her best friend, at her house in Meo Vac, a mountainous border district between Vietnam’s Ha Giang province and China, on October 27, 2018. Both girls are feared to have been sold as child brides. Photo: AFP
Kelley E. Currie
Opinion

Opinion

Kelley E. Currie, John Cotton Richmond and Samuel D. Brownback

How China’s ‘missing women’ problem has fuelled trafficking and forced marriage

  • To prevent trafficking, countries must better train their immigration officers and boost socioeconomic conditions in vulnerable areas, while China should make a sustained effort to punish perpetrators and support victims

Vu Thi Dinh, a Vietnamese mother, poses with a photograph of her missing teenage daughter Dua and her best friend, at her house in Meo Vac, a mountainous border district between Vietnam’s Ha Giang province and China, on October 27, 2018. Both girls are feared to have been sold as child brides. Photo: AFP
Vu Thi Dinh, a Vietnamese mother, poses with a photograph of her missing teenage daughter Dua and her best friend, at her house in Meo Vac, a mountainous border district between Vietnam’s Ha Giang province and China, on October 27, 2018. Both girls are feared to have been sold as child brides. Photo: AFP
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