Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor celebrates after winning the Hong Kong chief executive election in March 2017, after receiving 777 of the 1,194 votes cast. However a leader is chosen, what truly matters is the extent to which he or she is responsive to people’s needs, especially the most disenfranchised. Photo: Robert Ng
Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor celebrates after winning the Hong Kong chief executive election in March 2017, after receiving 777 of the 1,194 votes cast. However a leader is chosen, what truly matters is the extent to which he or she is responsive to people’s needs, especially the most disenfranchised. Photo: Robert Ng
Brian Y. S. Wong
Opinion

Opinion

Brian Y. S. Wong

Elected or not, Hong Kong’s chief executive must serve the people

  • Hong Kong should keep the practice of electing its leader, even if it is by a small committee, in view of its inherited mix of Western political values and Chinese cultural norms
  • But a leader’s performance is not contingent on how he or she is selected. The chief executive must be seen to be standing by the people

Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor celebrates after winning the Hong Kong chief executive election in March 2017, after receiving 777 of the 1,194 votes cast. However a leader is chosen, what truly matters is the extent to which he or she is responsive to people’s needs, especially the most disenfranchised. Photo: Robert Ng
Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor celebrates after winning the Hong Kong chief executive election in March 2017, after receiving 777 of the 1,194 votes cast. However a leader is chosen, what truly matters is the extent to which he or she is responsive to people’s needs, especially the most disenfranchised. Photo: Robert Ng
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