A woman shops at a supermarket in Shijiazhuang, Hebei province, on January 31. China must beware the risks of imported inflation from food, energy and raw materials. Photo: Xinhua
A woman shops at a supermarket in Shijiazhuang, Hebei province, on January 31. China must beware the risks of imported inflation from food, energy and raw materials. Photo: Xinhua
Neal Kimberley
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Neal Kimberley

Why a stronger yuan is still in China’s best interests

  • China, whose economy relies on US dollar-denominated food, energy and raw materials to sustain its recovery from Covid-19, has reason to be wary of dollar strength
  • A stronger renminbi will give the PBOC a freer hand to focus on monetary policy that supports the economy without worrying about imported inflation

A woman shops at a supermarket in Shijiazhuang, Hebei province, on January 31. China must beware the risks of imported inflation from food, energy and raw materials. Photo: Xinhua
A woman shops at a supermarket in Shijiazhuang, Hebei province, on January 31. China must beware the risks of imported inflation from food, energy and raw materials. Photo: Xinhua
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