A visitor looks at a display of Australian wines at an expo in Shanghai on November 5, 2020. China has raised import taxes on Australian wine, stepping up pressure on Australia over disputes including its support for a probe into the origins of the coronavirus. Photo: AP A visitor looks at a display of Australian wines at an expo in Shanghai on November 5, 2020. China has raised import taxes on Australian wine, stepping up pressure on Australia over disputes including its support for a probe into the origins of the coronavirus. Photo: AP
A visitor looks at a display of Australian wines at an expo in Shanghai on November 5, 2020. China has raised import taxes on Australian wine, stepping up pressure on Australia over disputes including its support for a probe into the origins of the coronavirus. Photo: AP
Winston Mok
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Winston Mok

How an Australian identity crisis may be fuelling recent tensions with China

  • The cause of the downward spiral in relations may not be Australian politicians’ unwise choices and China’s forceful reaction, but deeper structural forces at play in Australian society, particularly its cultural, political and economic ties to the US

A visitor looks at a display of Australian wines at an expo in Shanghai on November 5, 2020. China has raised import taxes on Australian wine, stepping up pressure on Australia over disputes including its support for a probe into the origins of the coronavirus. Photo: AP A visitor looks at a display of Australian wines at an expo in Shanghai on November 5, 2020. China has raised import taxes on Australian wine, stepping up pressure on Australia over disputes including its support for a probe into the origins of the coronavirus. Photo: AP
A visitor looks at a display of Australian wines at an expo in Shanghai on November 5, 2020. China has raised import taxes on Australian wine, stepping up pressure on Australia over disputes including its support for a probe into the origins of the coronavirus. Photo: AP
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Winston Mok

Winston Mok

Winston Mok, a private investor, was previously a private equity investor. He held senior regional positions with EMP Global and GE Capital, and was a McKinsey consultant and initiated its China practice. Winston obtained his bachelor and master degrees from MIT.