Shoppers stock up on provisions at a Walmart store, in New Jersey, in July 2020. There is a lot of pent-up demand in the household and business sectors which should support spending once infection rates are lower. Photo: Reuters
Shoppers stock up on provisions at a Walmart store, in New Jersey, in July 2020. There is a lot of pent-up demand in the household and business sectors which should support spending once infection rates are lower. Photo: Reuters
Chris Iggo
Opinion

Opinion

Macroscope by Chris Iggo

Why financial markets need not worry about inflation, for now

  • Central banks will not withdraw monetary policy support until inflation rises above 2 per cent for a sustained period. While a modest increase in inflation is to be expected, it is unlikely to be enough to push interest rates higher for some years to come

Shoppers stock up on provisions at a Walmart store, in New Jersey, in July 2020. There is a lot of pent-up demand in the household and business sectors which should support spending once infection rates are lower. Photo: Reuters
Shoppers stock up on provisions at a Walmart store, in New Jersey, in July 2020. There is a lot of pent-up demand in the household and business sectors which should support spending once infection rates are lower. Photo: Reuters
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