Spanish flu victims at a barracks hospital on the campus of Colorado Agricultural College, Fort Collins, Colorado, in 1918. Even the Spanish flu, which killed an estimated 100 million people, did not cause a prolonged downturn. Photo: Getty Images
Spanish flu victims at a barracks hospital on the campus of Colorado Agricultural College, Fort Collins, Colorado, in 1918. Even the Spanish flu, which killed an estimated 100 million people, did not cause a prolonged downturn. Photo: Getty Images
Jie Gan
Opinion

Opinion

Jie Gan, Mei Jianping and Florence Wang

What 500 years of history tells us about the long-term economic impact of pandemics

  • Research shows that past pandemics had no statistically significant impact on real economic growth, inflation, interest rates, exports or wages
  • The economy will probably rebound rapidly after Covid-19, given the new monetary tools available – the stock market confidence is far from misplaced

Spanish flu victims at a barracks hospital on the campus of Colorado Agricultural College, Fort Collins, Colorado, in 1918. Even the Spanish flu, which killed an estimated 100 million people, did not cause a prolonged downturn. Photo: Getty Images
Spanish flu victims at a barracks hospital on the campus of Colorado Agricultural College, Fort Collins, Colorado, in 1918. Even the Spanish flu, which killed an estimated 100 million people, did not cause a prolonged downturn. Photo: Getty Images
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