The Chinese flag flies behind razor wire at a housing compound in Xinjiang on June 4, 2020. The EU, in deciding whether to approve the investment deal, should think long and hard about China’s track record including in violating human rights. Photo: AFP The Chinese flag flies behind razor wire at a housing compound in Xinjiang on June 4, 2020. The EU, in deciding whether to approve the investment deal, should think long and hard about China’s track record including in violating human rights. Photo: AFP
The Chinese flag flies behind razor wire at a housing compound in Xinjiang on June 4, 2020. The EU, in deciding whether to approve the investment deal, should think long and hard about China’s track record including in violating human rights. Photo: AFP
Wendy Cutler
Opinion

Opinion

Wendy Cutler

On its own, the EU-China investment deal has little hope of holding Beijing to account

  • Given China’s history of ignoring bilateral agreements, how can the EU’s modest and incremental investment agreement hope to improve Beijing behaviour in problematic areas?
  • A collective approach, rooted in effective transatlantic cooperation, would at least have a fighting chance

The Chinese flag flies behind razor wire at a housing compound in Xinjiang on June 4, 2020. The EU, in deciding whether to approve the investment deal, should think long and hard about China’s track record including in violating human rights. Photo: AFP The Chinese flag flies behind razor wire at a housing compound in Xinjiang on June 4, 2020. The EU, in deciding whether to approve the investment deal, should think long and hard about China’s track record including in violating human rights. Photo: AFP
The Chinese flag flies behind razor wire at a housing compound in Xinjiang on June 4, 2020. The EU, in deciding whether to approve the investment deal, should think long and hard about China’s track record including in violating human rights. Photo: AFP
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Wendy Cutler

Wendy Cutler

Wendy Cutler is vice-president of the Asia Society Policy Institute and former acting deputy US Trade Representative.