Former Legco president Jasper Tsang attends an interview on November 16 last year. Tsang’s dismissal of the idea that the chief executive could be selected via consultation has sparked anger from the more conservative members of the loyalist camp. Photo: Dickson Lee Former Legco president Jasper Tsang attends an interview on November 16 last year. Tsang’s dismissal of the idea that the chief executive could be selected via consultation has sparked anger from the more conservative members of the loyalist camp. Photo: Dickson Lee
Former Legco president Jasper Tsang attends an interview on November 16 last year. Tsang’s dismissal of the idea that the chief executive could be selected via consultation has sparked anger from the more conservative members of the loyalist camp. Photo: Dickson Lee
Alice Wu
Opinion

Opinion

Alice Wu

Pro-establishment camp infighting takes focus away from Hong Kong’s pressing problems

  • The debate on selection of the chief executive has turned vicious, with several of the camp’s ‘deep blue’ faction training their guns on former Legco president Jasper Tsang
  • Meanwhile, pan-democrats are bracing themselves for more disqualifications as the government prepares to introduce the oath of allegiance for district councillors

Former Legco president Jasper Tsang attends an interview on November 16 last year. Tsang’s dismissal of the idea that the chief executive could be selected via consultation has sparked anger from the more conservative members of the loyalist camp. Photo: Dickson Lee Former Legco president Jasper Tsang attends an interview on November 16 last year. Tsang’s dismissal of the idea that the chief executive could be selected via consultation has sparked anger from the more conservative members of the loyalist camp. Photo: Dickson Lee
Former Legco president Jasper Tsang attends an interview on November 16 last year. Tsang’s dismissal of the idea that the chief executive could be selected via consultation has sparked anger from the more conservative members of the loyalist camp. Photo: Dickson Lee
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Alice Wu

Alice Wu

Alice Wu fell down the rabbit hole of politics aged 12, when she ran her first election campaign. She has been writing about local politics and current affairs for the Post since 2008. Alice's daily needs include her journals, books, a multi-coloured pen and several lattes.