A wind power base in Ulanqab, in China’s Inner Mongolia autonomous region, in August 2018. China has pledged to increase the share of non-fossil fuels in its primary energy consumption to 25 per cent by 2030. Photo: Xinhua A wind power base in Ulanqab, in China’s Inner Mongolia autonomous region, in August 2018. China has pledged to increase the share of non-fossil fuels in its primary energy consumption to 25 per cent by 2030. Photo: Xinhua
A wind power base in Ulanqab, in China’s Inner Mongolia autonomous region, in August 2018. China has pledged to increase the share of non-fossil fuels in its primary energy consumption to 25 per cent by 2030. Photo: Xinhua
Mathias Lund Larsen
Opinion

Opinion

The View by Mathias Lund Larsen

How China’s green finance slowdown threatens global climate ambitions

  • Growth in China’s green financing, even for its much-touted green bonds, appears to be stalling, as environmental priorities take a back seat in a year when the economy has struggled to recover from the Covid-19 pandemic

A wind power base in Ulanqab, in China’s Inner Mongolia autonomous region, in August 2018. China has pledged to increase the share of non-fossil fuels in its primary energy consumption to 25 per cent by 2030. Photo: Xinhua A wind power base in Ulanqab, in China’s Inner Mongolia autonomous region, in August 2018. China has pledged to increase the share of non-fossil fuels in its primary energy consumption to 25 per cent by 2030. Photo: Xinhua
A wind power base in Ulanqab, in China’s Inner Mongolia autonomous region, in August 2018. China has pledged to increase the share of non-fossil fuels in its primary energy consumption to 25 per cent by 2030. Photo: Xinhua
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Mathias Lund Larsen

Mathias Lund Larsen

Mathias Lund Larsen is senior research consultant at the International Institute of Green Finance at the Central University of Finance and Economics, Beijing and PhD Fellow at Copenhagen Business School.