President Joe Biden talks on the phone in the Oval Office of the White House on January 22. The days of US allies giving Washington blank-cheque support are over. Photo: White House / Zuma Wire/ zumapress.com President Joe Biden talks on the phone in the Oval Office of the White House on January 22. The days of US allies giving Washington blank-cheque support are over. Photo: White House / Zuma Wire/ zumapress.com
President Joe Biden talks on the phone in the Oval Office of the White House on January 22. The days of US allies giving Washington blank-cheque support are over. Photo: White House / Zuma Wire/ zumapress.com
Lee Seong-hyon
Opinion

Opinion

Lee Seong-hyon

US-China relations: who’s the alpha male? America’s friends and allies are watching closely

  • If America wants to repair its regional alliances, it must first show it can deal with Beijing from a position of strength
  • Small and medium-sized nations need assurances that they won’t be used merely as a tool to counter China, to be discarded the moment it suits the US to compromise with Beijing

President Joe Biden talks on the phone in the Oval Office of the White House on January 22. The days of US allies giving Washington blank-cheque support are over. Photo: White House / Zuma Wire/ zumapress.com President Joe Biden talks on the phone in the Oval Office of the White House on January 22. The days of US allies giving Washington blank-cheque support are over. Photo: White House / Zuma Wire/ zumapress.com
President Joe Biden talks on the phone in the Oval Office of the White House on January 22. The days of US allies giving Washington blank-cheque support are over. Photo: White House / Zuma Wire/ zumapress.com
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Lee Seong-hyon

Lee Seong-hyon

Lee Seong-hyon, PhD, is director of the Centre for Chinese Studies at Sejong Institute in Seoul. Formerly, he was director of Department of Unification Studies at Sejong. He is a graduate from Grinnell College, Harvard University, and Tsinghua University. He was Pantech Fellow of Stanford University. Currently he is also senior fellow (nonresident) at the Centre for Korean Peninsula Studies at Peking University.